Top five safari parks for seeing lions in the wild

As The Lion King celebrates its 15-year anniversary in London this week, The Telegraph has put forward its list of the Top Five places for spotting lions in the wild. Can you suggest any others?

The Top Five places to spot lions in the wild:

1. South Luangwa National Park, Zambia

2. Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya

3. Ruaha National Park, Tanzania

4. Okavango Delta, Botswana

5. Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Read more… Top five safari parks for seeing lions in the wild – Telegraph.

Tourists on safari stand their ground against charging African Bull Elephant in Kruger

This is the dramatic moment tourists on a safari stood their ground against a charging African Bull Elephant.

Rather than flee, these hikers at Kruger National Park in South Africa put aside their fears and faced down the raging mammal after they stumbled upon the creature in the bush.

And the onlookers kept their cool while one of the tourists captured the moment on a video camera when the beast squared-up to the group.

More photos and video…
Tourists on safari stand their ground against charging African Bull Elephant in Kruger | Daily Mail Online.

Photographer captures wildlife images

Photographer captures wildlife images

Saturday sunrises almost always find photographer Ronnie Maum on a Red River National Wildlife Refuge trail, anticipating what first light will reveal.

Will it be a flock of roseate spoonbills?

Bobcat kittens clinging to a tree?

Deer ghosting through the shadows?

Maum has taken thousands of wildlife images at the refuge in the past eight years and many are incorporated into the refuge’s on-site signage, website and printed materials. He’s self-published two e-books on the refuge and occasionally sells his photos.

But that’s not why he does it.

“I’m pretty much just a loner guy,” he said. “I’m happy just wandering around by myself taking pictures. You never know what you’re going to see.”

Read more…. Photographer captures wildlife images.

These Were the First Wildlife Photographs Published in National Geographic

Did you know that after National Geographic published its first wildlife photographs in July 1906, two of the National Geographic Society board members “resigned in disgust“? They argued that the reputable magazine was “turning into a ‘picture book’”.

Luckily for us, it did turn out to become quite a picture book. Those first wildlife photos published in the magazine were captured by George Shiras, III, and marked quite a few “firsts.”

Shiras was a lawyer and politician by day — a U.S. Representative from the state of Pennsylvania — and a pioneering photographer by night (literally!). His nighttime photographs of animals represent some of the earliest examples of flash photography.

To achieve his shots, Shiras pioneered a number of different photo-making methods. One was to float silently across water in complete darkness. When he heard rustling nearby, he would point his camera system and snap a flash photograph in that direction.

See more… These Were the First Wildlife Photographs Published in National Geographic.

50 Years of Wildlife Photographer of the Year – in pictures.

50 Years of Wildlife Photographer of the Year – in pictures | Environment | The Guardian

Natural History Museum’s new book released on Wednesday marks five decades of the WPY competition, celebrating the art of wildlife photography. Started in the 1960s, the 160 prize-winning and commended images represent 50 years of different times, styles and specialisms – showcasing some of the iconic images of wildlife on planet Earth, part of an exhibition in London from 24 October.

50 Years of Wildlife Photographer of the Year – in pictures | Environment | The Guardian

See more… 50 Years of Wildlife Photographer of the Year – in pictures | Environment | The Guardian.

In Brazil’s wetlands, jaguars face a new threat: Drug traffickers

The rise of jaguar watching tours in Brazil has brought a sea-change in the attitudes of ranchers.  The cats, once seen as a threat to livestock, are now seen as a big money draw.

But the recent discovery of a dead jaguar has raised an unexpected new threat: drug smugglers.  The fear is that drug smugglers who favour the quiet backwaters of the Pantanal are now shooting jaguars to deter the unwanted attention of tourists.

Read more… In Brazil’s wetlands, jaguars face a new threat: Drug traffickers | Al Jazeera America.

Revealed: four Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2014 images.

The first award-winning images from this years Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition are released as tickets for the exhibition go on sale.  A programme of special events, including photography masterclasses and portfolio reviews, has also been announced.

Bernardo Cesare captured his image Kaleidoscope in India while examining granulite rock from a working quarry. It depicts a crystal formation from a geological event half a billion years ago.

Young photographer Marc Montes took Snake-eyes while trekking through the forest in the Val d’Aran, Northern Spain.

A lone bat occupies a destroyed German WWII bunker in a remote forest in Poland in Winter hang-out by Łukasz Bożycki.

via Revealed: four Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2014 images | Natural History Museum.